Fairy Fantasy Trees from TwoGreenThumbs.com

“If you like it then you’d better put a swing on it.” These trees have me singing Beyonce all week. Lol! We’ve got more Fairy Fantasy Trees in stock.

DIY Miniature Fairy Garden Swings for Your Fairy Fantasy Trees!

I love it when a plan comes together. Check out how cute these fairy swings are floating in the breeze on┬áthese perfect miniature fairy garden trees! You can hang a swing from right away – no waiting for the plants to grow up!

Fairy Fantasy Trees from TwoGreenThumbs.com

DIY fairy swings are too fun to make! Every one turns out different – just like miniature fairy gardens.

Fairy Fantasy Trees from TwoGreenThumbs.com

I cut a piece of scrap wood and rounded the edges and drilled the holes for the wire. I wasn’t too precise – it’s supposed to look like a fairy made it.

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Fairy Fantasy Trees from TwoGreenThumbs.com

The heavier wire is softened by tendrils of thinner wire to make it lighter and airier – or more fairy like.

 

Fairy Fantasy Trees from TwoGreenThumbs.com

I tried hanging it by two wires but it was too stiff. I found I have better luck with hanging it by one wire, and now it swings in the breeze.

Cotoneasters are great miniature garden trees for containers or to plant it in the ground but note that the can be really invasive if left unchecked. If you are growing this in-ground “shovel-prune” the roots each spring and in early summer by cutting the roots with your shovel about 8″ to 10″ all the way around the base of the plant to sever any unwanted runners. Don’t be shy about this – this plant can handle it.

In containers, the Cotoneaster don’t seem to mind being root bound but after a few years, tip the tree out of the pot and trim/cut/shovel-cut the roots by a third, replace the soil with fresh potting soil and you’ll be set for another few years.

If you do get one of the “S” Cotoneasters, keep the “S” in shape by timing any wayward branches off whenever you see them – or you can let it revert back to its natural shape that will grow prostrate, or sideways along the ground. Don’t be afraid to prune it either, again, it can handle it.

Fairy Fantasy Trees from TwoGreenThumbs.com

Pretty little flowers on the Cotoneaster each spring. They turn to bright red berries (inedible) that last through the winter.

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Fairy Fantasy Trees from TwoGreenThumbs.com

The Twisty Mugo Pine made the perfect tree for twiggy fairy swing.

The Twisty Mugo Pine is perfect for any fairy garden. Mugos are drought tolerant, great in containers or in the ground, they love full sun, they can handle the heat and they are hardy to -40F! (Brrrr!) Snip or pinch any new growth along the trunk to maintain its shape.

 

Fairy Fantasy Trees from TwoGreenThumbs.com

For the seat of this fairy swing, I found a half-piece of driftwood log. I drilled it on either side for the wires to go through before decorating it.

 

Fairy Fantasy Trees from TwoGreenThumbs.com

You can see how I hid the wire with the reindeer moss and another twig. I cheated and used hot-glue for this project because the swing will sit “in the air” it, theoretically, should last.

 

Fairy Fantasy Trees from TwoGreenThumbs.com

DIY fairy swings – betcha you can’t make only one of them! Lol!

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Fairy Fantasy Trees from TwoGreenThumbs.com